Nov 05

The 2015 tax rates have just been announced by my friends at the IRS. If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you know how taxes work, more or less.

The tables aren’t the actual tax you pay on gross income, but on taxable income which is gross less a number of items, including the personal exemption which rises to $4,000 in ’15 and the standard deduction for single $6,300 or joint $12,600.

I’ll be referring back to this article over the next year whenever the tax table is part of the conversation. Check out the new rate table and start planning for 2015.

Single

Taxable income is over But not over The tax is Plus Of the amount over
$0 9,225 $0.00 10% $0
9,225 37,450 922.50 15% 9,225
37,450 90,750 5,156.26 25% 37,450
90,750 189,300 18,481.25 28% 90,750
189,300 411,500 46,075.25 33% 189,300
411,500 413,200 119,401.25 35% 411,500
413,200 119,996.25 39.6% 413,200

 

Married Filing Jointly
Qualifying Widow(er)

Taxable income is over But not over The tax is Plus Of the amount over
$0 18,450 $0.00 10% $0
18,450 74,900 1,845.00 15% 18,450
74,900 151,200 10,312.50 25% 74,900
151,200 230,450 29,387.50 28% 151,200
230,450 411,500 51,577.50 33% 230,450
411,500 464,850 111,324.00 35% 411,500
464,850 129,996.50 39.6% 464,850

 

written by Joe \\ tags: ,

Nov 03

This post has been in the works for some time, nearly two years. Talk about a bit of writer’s block!

Attending FinCon14 (The Financial Bloggers Conference) gave me a chance to share my story, and hear so many people encourage me to write and share it with my readers as well.

Two years ago, shortly after my 50th birthday, my wife and I were both let go in a company layoff. 30 years, working for the same company, had come to an end. We both had our eye on our number and we had already agreed that she could retire as soon as she was ready to. The numbers all pointed to me taking a bit of an early retirement by 55 or so. Our jobs were in high tech sales, and I started out really liking it, but the last 10 years or so, I grew to dislike it more and more. So much so, that when I got word I was getting let go, I had a sense of relief. The real question is why I stayed so long at a job I grew to hate. And a great question that is. The money was good, but any lateral move in the industry would have replaced the salary. In fact, depending on the economy, there were times I could have landed a higher paying job. Familiarity. Fear of change. Stockholm syndrome?

Regardless of why I stayed, it was over. On the ride home, I told my wife it was time to move on, and do something completely different. Neither of us were in too big of a rush, as the severance and unemployment benefits were enough to float us for a full year without needing to tap our savings. Many times in life, one observes that timing is everything, the layoff was in late 2012, and in 2013 the market had its best year since 1997, returning over 32%.

SP2013

S&P Oct’12 – Dec’13

Had the movement of the market been different, I might have felt pressure to go in another direction. As 2013 moved along, our number seemed much closer to achievement. We sat down with our money manager software online, reviewed our budget, and found that our spending was a comfortable 50% or so of our last few years’ income. On a side note, the rules about 80% replacement rate are rules of thumb and little more. What really counts is what you spend, not what your final gross income was.

One interest I’d always considered was a career as a math teacher. I took the qualification exams for both middle and high school math. Despite what they say about the lack of teachers, in my area, every position had a line of dozens of teachers applying. If I were hiring, I’d look for someone with experience, too. Just as I was pondering the idea of simply being retired, I was contacted about a position as a math aide. The job was part time, just 2 days a week, and the responsibilities included giving exams to students, tutoring students to help them catch up on missed classes, and helping them study for upcoming exams. The key things missing were any required interaction with parents, prep for lectures, and any paperwork. Even for this position, there were multiple candidates. Whatever I said during the interview must have made an impression. A combination of fondness for my own study over 3 decades ago, sharing how I was helping my daughter, an 8th grader at the time, and feeling that I could make a difference in his department. The next night, I had an email saying the job was mine.

By coincidence, a neighbor was expanding his own business as a real estate investor and developer. He approached me and asked if I’d like to come work for him. I started both jobs the same week and within two months, I had my real estate license. Both jobs started as trial positions, and as it turned out I am having a blast in both fields. Both of my bosses asked me when I planned to work for them full time. For now, the two jobs are ideal for me. I’ll share some stories of my days at both jobs, and why I wake up with a smile at 5:15 AM when I swore I wasn’t a morning person. I’m also investing in real estate again, an endeavor I’d given up on over 20 years ago, but I’ve now been given a second chance.

written by Joe \\ tags: ,

Oct 31

Of all the potential problems life can serve up to us, money problems rank among the most stressful without a doubt. Ruminating about mounting debt, having trouble paying bills, knowing we are making bad choices can do quite a number on us mentally. If denial is no longer doing it for you, and you are ready to move towards a more ordered financial life, here are some helpful strategies to get you there.

Do a Mental Purge

One of the reasons we let our money troubles get so out of hand is our tendency to push our troubles out of our minds and go into denial mode. Obviously on some level, we are aware of the damage, but so long as we don’t fully face up, we can continue to divert our attention elsewhere.

Actually thinking about the situation for too long is unpleasant to say the least, but this refusal to think about it is just prolonging the suffering. One of the first steps in righting your money wrongs is doing a mental purge of all your worries and problems. Face them head on. This is very powerful.

So, bust out a pen and paper—this is more powerful than just typing it out—and write down all the stuff that has been floating around in your head. What money worries are you currently dealing with? What do you fear will happen now, or in the future because of these problems? Don’t hold back..just let it all out.

What Will Provide Immediate Relief?

You didn’t get into a financial mess overnight, and you can’t expect to clean it up this quickly either. But, don’t focus too much on the whole picture—it will just make you feel super-bummed, and your motivation will drain very quickly. Think about what you can do immediately to provide some relief.

Perhaps there are some inaccuracies with your credit report that need your attention. If they are bigger issues, or you don’t have the time to stay on top of the process, it might be a good idea to find a reputable credit repair company to assist you in correcting these errors. If you haven’t filed your taxes, do so, and once the bill comes, call the IRS to discuss a payment plan. If there are any expenses you can cut immediately that will put some extra money in your pocket, do it.

No matter how small the step, it is a good thing because it moves you out of a place of feeling powerless.

Visualize the Improved Situation

There is a lot of power in visualization when it comes to making positive change. It gives us something to focus on. When we get into a space where we can see and feel the more ideal circumstances of a particular aspect of our life, it motivates us to make this our reality.

What would a better financial life look like to you? Do you see yourself making regular deposits into your savings account? Do you see yourself truly enjoying nights out because you truly have the money to spend on a nice dinner or concert? What does this life feel like? It probably feels pretty good. Think about the lack of anxiety and fear that comes with having all bills paid on time, budgeting properly and managing debt responsibly. How much more peace would you feel if you had a nicely padded savings account, or the oft-talked about ‘emergency fund?’

Visualize yourself as being responsible with money and financially savvy—this may seem challenging from your current space. But, it is important to realize your situation now was not borne of some DNA defect that made you bad with money. It was borne of bad habits, lack of education and awareness and poor decisions. All of that is of the mind and can be changed.

Where you are now probably feels really uncomfortable. Facing up to our money troubles is scary, but this willingness sets a very powerful intention. So long as you commit to following through, and taking things a step at a time, you can turn things around.

 

written by Joe \\ tags: ,

Oct 26

This year has flown by and as we approach year end, the IRS shares the numbers that will impact your 2015 retirement savings limits. 2013 inflation was low enough that we saw no increase in ’14. 2015, however, sees a bit of a bump, so let me share these numbers.

Employee contributions to 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $17,500 to $18,000. The cath-up provision, for those 55 and older in 2015 is also increased a bit, to $6,000.

The IRA limit is unchanged at $5,500 with a $1,000 catch-up for 50 and older. The phaseout for IRA deductibility for a single filer covered by a workplace retirement plan is between $61,000 and $71,000, and for married filing joint, between $183,000 and $193,000. The AGI phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $181,000 to $191,000 for married couples filing jointly.

The AGI phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $183,000 to $193,000 for married couples filing jointly.  For singles and heads of household, the income phase-out range is $116,000 to $131,000.

There are still quite a few numbers we need to see. Marginal rates, HSA limits, FSA limits, etc. As soon as I see the IRS press release, I’ll share the numbers.

written by Joe \\ tags: ,

Sep 13

IncomeGapAn issue that wont go away and lately, pretty tough to ignore.

written by Joe \\ tags: ,